TEDx: Mark Foster Gage, Architect, Innovator, Possible Bender of Design Realities…

Mark Foster Gage is not only an architect and the
current Assistant Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, he’s also known to be quite an innovator of the practice with his design methodology merging advanced technologies (interactivity, virtual reality, robotics, 3D printing, spacial social media, etc.), philosophical speculation and interdisciplinary collaboration (with musicians, technology companies, clothing lines, media outlets, etc.).

Continue reading “TEDx: Mark Foster Gage, Architect, Innovator, Possible Bender of Design Realities…”

Acoustics, The EverNoteBook, HAWP & Brawler Lawler – PractitioNERD WIRed #15

http://blip.tv/practitionerd/acoustics-the-evernotebook-hawp-brawler-lawler-practitionerd-wired-15-6386271

Did you see anything different?

This week, why architects should design with their ears, Evernote launches the Smart Notebook, why should you be watching “Hey Ash, Whatcha’ Playin,” and Jerry Lawler’s AWA-Memphis brawl in 1981. Plus, the QUESTION OF THE WEEK!   Continue reading “Acoustics, The EverNoteBook, HAWP & Brawler Lawler – PractitioNERD WIRed #15”

Julian Treasure Asks Architects in TED Talk to Use Their…EARS?!?

Practically any conversation involving architecture involves space, place, form, experience, and meaning, which derive from architecture’s sensory experience involving light, touch, smell and sound. The latter of the senses is to topic of the TED Talk given by sound expert Julian Treasure, as he petitions architects to design for our ear. The basis of this plea on how the quality of a building’s acoustics affect us physiologically, socially, psychologically and behaviorally.   Continue reading “Julian Treasure Asks Architects in TED Talk to Use Their…EARS?!?”

Bjarke Ingels on “Hedonistic Sustainability” at TEDxEast

Bjarke Ingels’ architecture is known for being luxurious, sustainable and community-focused. In this TED lecture, he showcases his playful designs and unlikely architectural solutions, ranging from a factory chimney that blows smoke rings, to a ski slope built atop a waste processing plant (which was from a design competition he recently won).  It is often described that “theory meets pragmatism meets optimism” in Ingels’ architecture, as his think-big philosophy comes from his hands-on, deeply-thought-out, grassroots (from the bottom-up) understanding of the needs of a building’s occupants and local environment.   Continue reading “Bjarke Ingels on “Hedonistic Sustainability” at TEDxEast”

TED Talk: Daniel Libeskind’s 17 Words of Architectural Inspiration

This TED Talk by Daniel Libeskind may have been filmed back in 2009, but this lecture has yet to decline in its popularity. Libeskind at one point was a free-verse poet, an opera set designer and a talented musician who would later become an internationally-famous architect who has been both praised and criticized for his glorious design style (you know, like almost EVERY OTHER ARCHITECT).  In this TED Talk, Libeskind describes what inspires his unique approach to architecture in only seventeen words. For example, he starts out by stating his belief that optimism is the driving force of architecture, which is why he states, “Architecture is not based on concrete and steel and the elements of the soil. It’s based on wonder.”  Watch the full lecture after the break.

Continue reading “TED Talk: Daniel Libeskind’s 17 Words of Architectural Inspiration”

Architecture critic Inga Saffron believes that skyscrapers are O-VER-RA-TED **clap-clap, clap-clap-clap**

Skyscrappers are a signature piece and building type in the realm of architecture. Created with the spirit of being able to build so high and touch the sky (no so different from the goal of the European cathedrals), and now it seems that every architectural firm is trying to make their name as designing and building the world’s tallest new skyscraper (with the currently record … Continue reading Architecture critic Inga Saffron believes that skyscrapers are O-VER-RA-TED **clap-clap, clap-clap-clap**

Rate this: