Mecanoo’s National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts in Taiwan

© Iwan Baan

The recently-opened National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan — inspired by the mass collections of banyan trees that are common in its locale — was designed by Dutch architecture firm Mecanoo.  This single building — which is also the largest performing arts center under a singular roof as well as Taiwan’s most significant cultural investment in a generation — covers a surface area of approximately 35 acres, a little over a quarter of the size of the surrounding 116-acre subtropical park in the area, acting as on of the country’s most culturally significant investment. The building features a 2,236-seat Opera House, a 1,981-seat Concert Hall, a 1,210-seat Playhouse, a 434-seat Recital Hall and an Outdoor Theater that connects the building to the park. Continue reading “Mecanoo’s National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts in Taiwan”

So, Can ‘Grand Theft Auto: Taiwan’ Be a Thing?

I know, I know, I know what you’re probably saying. But Montez, we already have Sleeping Dogs! Yeah, well Sleeping Dogs IS an awesome game, but that takes place in Hong Kong, not Taiwan. As of now, there is no such video game as Grand Theft Auto Taiwan, but as this live action clip showcases, there probably should be. C’mon Rockstar… Continue reading So, Can ‘Grand Theft Auto: Taiwan’ Be a Thing?

Rate this:

SuperForests Networks LEGO Witnessing Punk Grammar – WIRed #74

http://blip.tv/practitionerd/superforests-networks-lego-witnessing-punk-grammar-wired-74-6693160

Welcome to WIRed #74, where superstructures elevate a forest over ground, a hacked LEGO train is used to network and transfer information and data, the use of architecture in the upcoming video game ‘The Witness’, and CM Punk uses grammar to give online trolls the good ol’ G-T-S!!

Continue reading “SuperForests Networks LEGO Witnessing Punk Grammar – WIRed #74”

This Taiwan Tower is a MOST Surreal Building…

If you take a good look at that little strip of green on top of that building, you’ll see that it’s actually a forest, and it’s floating 1000 feet above Taiwan’s skyline.  This forest is actually sitting on a blue glow of anti-gravity beams (NAH, I’m just kidding). Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Taiwan Tower, a banyan tree-like structure designed by Tokyo-based architect Sou Fujimoto, a giant steel superstructure that may become the most surreal piece of engineering ever seen. It was selected as the first prize winner for the Taiwan Tower International Competition in 2011, and it reflects on Fujimoto’s philosophy of Primitive Future, as the “21st Century Oasis” that aspires to be a model of green architecture for the future generations of buildings. Continue reading “This Taiwan Tower is a MOST Surreal Building…”