A Colonial House Recovery on 64th Street; I Smell a Holiday Movie Franchise…

© Pim Schalkwijk

Riddle me this, Batman (assuming that you’re Batman, of course): what happens if the building — in this case in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico — you’re converting into a bar is cataloged as a Historic Monument by the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico, which doesn’t allow ANY modification of the property? Well, you’re limited to only being able to recover the existing architectural elements (in this case, iron and wood) and design the project with complete and absolute fidelity to the original building. Re-purposing and rehabilitating a historic structure can be complicated enough, but the Nauzet Rodríguez team pulled it off real well. Continue reading “A Colonial House Recovery on 64th Street; I Smell a Holiday Movie Franchise…”

African Palladio, WiFi Moochers, BLOPS2 Memes & Starrcade – WIRed #23

http://blip.tv/practitionerd/african-palladio-wifi-moochers-blops2-memes-starrcade-wired-23-6460163

The Future is SO BRIGHT……

This week on WIRed #23 (JORDAN!), Palladio’s architectural style found in AFRICA, WiFi moochers better beware, Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 memes, and the brief story behind NWA Starrcade!   Continue reading “African Palladio, WiFi Moochers, BLOPS2 Memes & Starrcade – WIRed #23”

Find Palladio’s Influence On Freed American Slaves’ Homes

St Paul Episcopal Church, 1853, Caldwell, Liberia. Photo: Max Belcher 1978

What do you think of when you hear the name Andrea Palladio? No who understands architectural history can answer.  OK, you can answer; better yet, I’ll answer.  Palladio — himself influenced by Roman and Greek architecture– was an Italian architect who is often widely regarded as the father of Western architecture.  His style, design influence, and teachings are summarized in his architectural treatise, The Four Books of Architecture, which gained him wide recognition. Palladio’s impact reached beyond typical locations, as this exhibit — “Genealogies” by photographer Max Belcher — points out at the newly-renovated Palladio Museum.  Some examples of the Italian architect’s encroaching influence includes the homes built by freed American slaves upon returning to Africa.   Continue reading “Find Palladio’s Influence On Freed American Slaves’ Homes”