Norman Foster on How 3D Printing Will Transform Architecture

Norman Foster Explains How 3D Printing Will Transform ArchitectureLast year, legendary architect Lord Norman Foster and his colleagues at the European Space Agency surprised EVERYONE with a plan to build a lunar base via 3D-printing local moon dust into a structure. Sure, that’s really awesome to do that on the moon, but what about on Earth and how 3D printing can change how we build cities? Gizmodo’s Adam Clark Estes got the chance to ask Foster that question at the Center for Architecture in New York City. Foster had spent an hour talking about how Beaux-Art legend Rafael Guastavino —  famous for his patented technique of building fireproof tile arches and vaults — influenced his work, and outlined his firm’s plan to 3D-print a vaulted, igloo-shaped moon base. Continue reading “Norman Foster on How 3D Printing Will Transform Architecture”

ArchSelfies Free SIMs Mother Wii Factions – WIRed #95

http://blip.tv/practitionerd/archselfies-free-sims-mother-wii-factions-wired-95-6849305

It’s time for Episode 95 of WIRed, where Montez McCrary discusses classic (but fake) architect selfies, carrier-free SIM cards in Holland, a fan-made Mother collection on Wii, and pro wrestling’s greatest factions! Welcome to WIRed, bringing you the nerdy-geekery on architecture, technology, gaming, and pro wrestling. Continue reading “ArchSelfies Free SIMs Mother Wii Factions – WIRed #95”

Historic Bond Sinks/Bathes JoJo with Perfect Flair – WIRed #86

http://blip.tv/practitionerd/historic-bond-sinks-bathes-jojo-with-perfect-flair-wired-86-6724558
It’s time for Episode #86 of WIRed, where Montez McCrary discusses Bond, J. Max Bond, Architect, a single-fixture bathtub and bathroom sink, how JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure looks awesome in MS Paint, and Mr. Perfect vs. The Nature Boy on RAW! Welcome to WIRed, bringing you the nerdy-geekery on architecture, technology, gaming, and pro wrestling. Continue reading “Historic Bond Sinks/Bathes JoJo with Perfect Flair – WIRed #86”

My Favorite Entries from Hello Wood 2013

For the fourth year, the creative camp Hello Wood took place last month in the countryside north of Lake Balaton in Hungary. At the event (under the motto “Step Closer”), 120 young architects and designers, along with leading experts, worked to design, create, and construct installations that address social and community issues in architecture.  The twelve teams assembled at Hello Wood had only a full week to create these installations using — you guessed it — timber as the primary material. At the end of the week, every project created would be judged and a winner is selected and awarded, but I want to share some of my favorite installations from this year’s Hello Wood event, after the break! Continue reading “My Favorite Entries from Hello Wood 2013”

Norma Merrick Sklarek – Great African-American Architects

Norma Merrick Sklarek  (April 15, 1928 – February 6, 2012) was the first African-American woman to be licensed as an architect in the United States — the first to be licensed in the state of New York in 1954 and in the state of California in 1962 —  as well as the first woman to be elected Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.  Shlarek accomplished many firsts for black women in architecture, including establishing the first architectural firm to be formed and managed by an African-American woman in 1985, Siegel, Sklarek, Diamond, which was the largest woman-owned and mostly woman-staffed architectural firm in the United States.   Continue reading “Norma Merrick Sklarek – Great African-American Architects”

An Old Prison Paroled, Now a Civic Center. YAY!

Originally erected in Palencia, Spain at the turn of the 19th century, this brick building was intended to house criminals from petty crimes to serious offences. Now, over 100 years later, this building — thanks to EXIT Architects — has transformed in a hub of cultural education for the local residents.  What used to be the Palencia Provincial Prison is now rechristened the Palencia Civic Center, a neo-mudejar style building which offers services ranging from music lessons, meeting rooms, a public library, and much more.   Continue reading “An Old Prison Paroled, Now a Civic Center. YAY!”

The Eels Nest (more a house than…..eels’s nest, though…)

Sorry to disappoint fans of aquatic wildlife, but alas, this is a post about a work of architecture.  The name “Eel’s Nest” is a commonly used term that describes a very narrow lot (typically with a width of 15 feet). This particular lot in the area of Echo Park in Los Angeles has a width of exactly 15 feet, and architect Simon Storey decided to take up the challenge to experiment with designing and erecting a compact and efficient urban dwelling. But how would you achieve such a feat, you ask? Why, by building vertically, or course! Storey was able to design both simply and minimally in accordance to the site’s size limitations, and used the entire lot to create a functional house.

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Architect Rem Koolhaas was on “The Simpsons!” Mind. Blown!

In a recent episode of “The Simpsons” entitled “A Totally Fun Thing Bart Will Never Do Again” (Season 23, Episode 19) that aired April 29th, noted architect Rem Koolhaas made a brief guest appearance.  In the scene, he is seen teaching and lecuring a group of students, while working as an architecture instructor.  Koolhaas, as seen in the above image, sports a half-bald hairstyle and is holding a … Continue reading Architect Rem Koolhaas was on “The Simpsons!” Mind. Blown!

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TED Talk: Daniel Libeskind’s 17 Words of Architectural Inspiration

This TED Talk by Daniel Libeskind may have been filmed back in 2009, but this lecture has yet to decline in its popularity. Libeskind at one point was a free-verse poet, an opera set designer and a talented musician who would later become an internationally-famous architect who has been both praised and criticized for his glorious design style (you know, like almost EVERY OTHER ARCHITECT).  In this TED Talk, Libeskind describes what inspires his unique approach to architecture in only seventeen words. For example, he starts out by stating his belief that optimism is the driving force of architecture, which is why he states, “Architecture is not based on concrete and steel and the elements of the soil. It’s based on wonder.”  Watch the full lecture after the break.

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China’s Dilemma of New Construction vs. Architectural Legacy/Heritage

The art and method of reusing building materials from older buildings for newer building is nothing new; the Romans harvested construction materials from older structures to build new monuments, just as later Roman monuments were harvested for new construction in medieval times.  This strategy, from the “pro” side, of considering the “design-science of the life of buildings” rather than just the “art of building” was a suggestion of futurist Steward Brandt.  A problem, the “con,” that could arise from that is the structures that could have been deemed culturally and historically significant were razed for the sole purpose of new construction.  Granted, the importance of historic preservation may or may not have been as important then as it is today, but now it has become a legitimate alternative, guideline, and preference in architecture.  Unfortunately for China, according to an article in Architect: The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects, they may have fallen into the “con” category.

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