Here’s the AIA’s Documentary on Rural Studio, Kicking Off the 2016 “I Look Up” Film Challenge

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) launched their second annual I Look Up Film Challenge, where architects and other design professionals can produce short documentaries about the impact of architecture. This year’s challenge kicked off with a short film on Rural Studio, Auburn University’s design-build program. The documentary showcases the small town of Newbern, Alabama, and how the town’s been impacted through Rural Studio’s design and construction of a new fire station and library. The short film shows the program’s design process from early schematic drawings through the end of construction through a series of short interviews. Continue reading “Here’s the AIA’s Documentary on Rural Studio, Kicking Off the 2016 “I Look Up” Film Challenge”

Metro Subs Cheap Photoshop Fanboys Del Rey – WIRed #89

http://blip.tv/practitionerd/metro-subs-cheap-photoshop-fanboys-del-rey-wired-89-6750022

It’s time for Episode 89 of WIRed, where Montez McCrary discusses the AIA 25 Year Award winner — The DC Metro –, cheap alternatives to Adobe PhotoShop, how annoying fanboys and fangirls are ruining gaming, and the awesome Sara Del Rey; because she’s awesome! Welcome to WIRed, bringing you the nerdy-geekery on architecture, technology, gaming, and pro wrestling. Continue reading “Metro Subs Cheap Photoshop Fanboys Del Rey – WIRed #89”

The D.C. Subway System wins AIA’s 25 Year Award!

The American Institute of Architects have presented its 25 Year Award since 1969 to honor a building that’s been around for 25 to 35 years; so not THAT old for buildings, however by our traditional standards can seem pretty old by our contemporary points-of-view. The AIA uses this award to recognize buildings with “enduring significance” that have “stood the test of time.” Some of the buildings that were recipients include the Seagram Building in 1984, the Salk Institute in 1990, and the Airforce Academy Cadet Chapel, the General Motors Technical Center, and the Eames House have all won the award, as well.  This year’s winner, though, is less of a BUILDING, and more of a whole SERIES of BUILDINGS, as the D.C. Metro, designed by Chicago architect Harry Weese, took the honors for 2014. Continue reading “The D.C. Subway System wins AIA’s 25 Year Award!”

Black History Month: J. Max Bond, Jr., Architect [1935-2009]

While J. Max Bond, Jr. was a student at Harvard University, a group of racists burned a cross outside his dormitory. Out of concern, a white professor of Bond’s at the University suggested he change his career path and put aside his dream of becoming an architect one day.  In a 2004 interview with the Washington Post, Bond recalled his professor saying, “There have never been any famous, prominent black architects… You’d be wise to choose another profession.”  However, after spending a summer working for African-American architect Paul Williams, Bond knew that he should continue following his dream and overcome racial stereotypes in the field. Continue reading “Black History Month: J. Max Bond, Jr., Architect [1935-2009]”

AIA 2013 National Convention: Top Stories, Day 3/3

****DAY ONE****
****DAY THREE****

Annually around this time of year, the American Institute of Architects convenes for its National Convention and Design Exposition.  This year, the convention takes place in Denver, CO., where the theme this year is “Building Leaders”.  Now that the 2013 AIA National Convention is complete, I wish to provide a couple of briefs about the stories made today at the show.  Here are my TWO (yes, two; the show ends quicker today than the prior two days, so less things happened) favorite stories from third and FINAL day of the 2013 AIA National Convention.  But believe me, these TWO stories are awesome and worth it. Continue reading “AIA 2013 National Convention: Top Stories, Day 3/3”

AIA 2013 National Convention: Top Five Stories, Day 2/3

****DAY ONE****
****DAY TWO****

Annually around this time of year, the American Institute of Architects convenes for its National Convention and Design Exposition.  This year, the convention takes place in Denver, CO., where the theme this year is “Building Leaders”.  Now that day two of 2013 AIA National Convention is complete, I wish to provide a few briefs about the stories made today at the show.  Here are my five (5) favorite stories from day two of the 2013 AIA National Convention. Continue reading “AIA 2013 National Convention: Top Five Stories, Day 2/3”

AIA 2013 National Convention: Top Five Stories, Day 1/3

****DAY ONE****
****DAY ONE****

Annually around this time of year, the American Institute of Architects convenes for its National Convention and Design Exposition.  This year, the convention takes place in Denver, CO., where the theme this year is “Building Leaders”.  Now that day one of 2013 AIA National Convention is complete, I wish to provide a few briefs about the stories made today at the show.  Here are my five (5) favorite stories from day one of the 2013 AIA National Convention. Continue reading “AIA 2013 National Convention: Top Five Stories, Day 1/3”

MIT’s “The Black Architect’s Journey” Conference on Architecture, Race and Academe

Architecture and planning dean Adele Santos, left: Ted Landsmark, director of Boston Architectural College, center, and Ho Yung Chang, architecture department head, welcomed participants to ‘Architecture Race Academe: The Black Architect’s Journey.’
[Photo / Donna Coveney]
Back at MIT in March of 2007, almost 80 people gathered for a 1-1/2 day conference hosted by the MIT College of Architecture to discuss why only 1% of AIA members are black and why there are fewer than five black professors full-time at major architecture schools in the country.  Just to show how dedicated, tough, and COMPLETELY BOSS these guests and panelists were, they didn’t allow a late-winter blizzard (that shut down most of the airports in Boston) stop them.   Continue reading “MIT’s “The Black Architect’s Journey” Conference on Architecture, Race and Academe”

Frank Gehry’s Residence, 2012 AIA 25-Year Award Winner; Can You See The House?

I hope you can see it; it should be the easiest Where’s Waldo puzzle you’ve ever come across (remember Waldo kids?). The American Institute of Architects (remember them) conducted an interview with famed architect Frank Gehry — the recipient of the 2012 25-Year Award and architect of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial project — to talk about his unorthodox residence in Santa Monica that has hugely impacted and influenced architectural practice and theory in the last 30+ years.  Plus, there’s a story that the Homeowner’s Association forced Gehry to put a chain link fence on the property, so he did; by incorporating it INTO the house itself.  Now that’s what we, on the internet, call “pwnage.”  Check out more about the house (and a video; ooh-la-la) after the break.

Continue reading “Frank Gehry’s Residence, 2012 AIA 25-Year Award Winner; Can You See The House?”