The Weekn’der, designed by Lazor Office (NOT Located on the Head of a Shark…)

© George Henrich

When explaining some of the features of their Week’nder building, located in Ashland County, Wisconsin, design firm Lazor Office states that the structure opens and closes, as the façades transition from transparent and bright to dark and opaque as you transverse around the exterior or the interior. The wood (plywood and pine) and steel (corrugated and smooth) supported building’s design and construction is based on two prefabricated modules delivered by truck and ferries, minimal concrete for foundation and bottle jacks instead of a crane. The combined parallel modules contained the three bedrooms, two bathrooms, kitchen, laundry room and additional infrastructure, and were joined together with a shared gable roof that itself created an shared and tent-like “dry-space”. The aforementioned design and structural materials give the weekend getaway cabin a rustic feel, as well as a additionally balanced coordination of various colors and textures. Continue reading “The Weekn’der, designed by Lazor Office (NOT Located on the Head of a Shark…)”

The Albany by RKD Architects is NOT in Albany; It’s in Dublin. So, There You Go…

© Ste Murray

The Albany, located in Dublin, Ireland and designed by RKD Architects, is a modernist-style pavilion (measuring at nearly 4,900 square feet) that aims to reinterpret the seaside villa house type. This visually distinct building — compared to the surrounding ones — is built on one corner of the build site and utilizes a varied mix of materials and features a new structure frames for viewing the nearby Dublin Bay.  The existing site was lowered to create a garden — while accessible from all of the building’s bedrooms — that would add seclusion and privacy to the site. The exterior showcases a reinforced concrete frame with seamless glass ribbon windows along the main upper floor, while seemingly floating above the lower level plinth; intentionally done to resemble the seawall and to evoke the Martello towers located along the local coastline.

Continue reading “The Albany by RKD Architects is NOT in Albany; It’s in Dublin. So, There You Go…”

The Coastal Craftsman Tiny Home Goes ALL IN on Interior Design…

Image result for coastal craftsman handcrafted movement

The interesting puzzle of living in a tiny home involves cutting down on size while also having optimal living space. While many tiny home builders and companies get pretty creative when designing the layout of the home, this often leaves out several opportunities for expressive interior design details.  This is not the case of the the Coastal Craftsman tiny home by Handcrafted Movement, which took the road-less-traveled by not sacrificing intricate interior design in a tiny home. Handcrafted Movement — a company based in Washington that has been featured on HGTV, Curbed, Country Living, Architectural Digest, Today, and more — was “born out of a desire to pursue excellence and creativity. This is about more than just creating products. This is about questioning the status quo and finding a more excellent way in all that we put our head, heart and hands to. This is about playing a part in the rebirth of American quality, ingenuity and pride in manufacturing.” Continue reading “The Coastal Craftsman Tiny Home Goes ALL IN on Interior Design…”

From Private Home to Multipurpose Facility, or the Barn at Critter Creek by Furman + Keil Architects (Or BOTH; No Need to Pick Sides…)

In a previous life, Critter Creek existed as purely residential home for over 20 years, but its time was running out as it was scheduled for demolition for the family’s new home.  However, the family and design firm Furman+Keil Architects opted to re-purpose the building and relocate it to a new location in order to preserve the memories and spirit of the place. First, the … Continue reading From Private Home to Multipurpose Facility, or the Barn at Critter Creek by Furman + Keil Architects (Or BOTH; No Need to Pick Sides…)

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Steven Holl’s Competition-Winning Museum Design Inspired by Historic 9th Century Fortress

Courtesy of Steven Holl

Steven Holl Architects international competition-winning design for the Angers Collectors Museum and nearby hotel in the historic city of Angers, France is an example of architectural history influencing and being paid homage in modern architectural projects. Their design — via collaboration with developers Compagine de Phalsbourg — takes inspiration from the nearby 9th century Chateau d’Angers fortress, and aims to create the city’s new cultural gateway. The museum’s exposed titanium and concrete connects to the linear hotel with a weaving clear adn translucent glass facade — inspired by the 14th century Apocalypse Tapestry on display at the Chateau d’Angers. But the historic connections don’t stop there; there will also exist a sereis of reflecting pools that will reference the river that used to consume that same site. Continue reading “Steven Holl’s Competition-Winning Museum Design Inspired by Historic 9th Century Fortress”

The Dumbo Townhouses by Alloy Design; Don’t Let The Name Fool You…

© Pavel Bendov

Located at 55 Pearl Street in Brooklyn, New York (near the intersection at Water Street), the Dumbo Townhouse — designed by Alloy Architects — is a 18,000 square foot 5 unit housing complex that opened in 2015. Now, about that name “Dumbo,” which I should immediately correct at “DUMBO,” as the project involved the demolition of the existing single-story warehouse in the DUMBO Historic Section of Brooklyn.  The typical townhouse units at Dumbo measure at approximately 18′ wide (with the corner unit measuring at 19′ 2″ wide) with a raised private entrance at ground level. Each unit also has a shared drive with parking spaces for each townhouse, placed behind the garden level at grade. Continue reading “The Dumbo Townhouses by Alloy Design; Don’t Let The Name Fool You…”

The Italian Villa Featured in “Call Me By Your Name” Is Up For Sale

The sprawling and well-preserved 16th century Italian villa featured prominently in the Academy Award nominated coming-of-age film, Call Me By Your Name, is for sale. The film’s director Luca Guadagnino told Architectural Digest “”I had known that house for many years; I even dreamed of buying that house. I knew where I was going to set the action of the film—this place with faded, aristocratic charm, that a professor and his wife might have inherited but can’t quite keep up.” Continue reading “The Italian Villa Featured in “Call Me By Your Name” Is Up For Sale”

The “Trace” App by Morpholio Lets You Update Construction Design Changes On The Fly!

I recall in my days in the world of architecture as an intern where I’d go to job sites to document existing features, take measurements, and make changes to exiting construction documents on paper and digitally in AutoCAD — or even searching and finding the original construction documents in the school district archives because the school claimed to have lost them; I’m looking at you Alamo Heights ISD.  Anyway, more times than not you’d be on a project site and find  a problem that needed immediate attention. The problem is that once the project heads to the Construction Administration phase is NOT the best time for big design changes, new field conditions, client changes, errors, etc., etc…. Thankfully, Morpholio has updated their TracePro iPhone app, allowing users to alter job sites by simply “importing key components of the design process into the Construction Administration phase.” Continue reading “The “Trace” App by Morpholio Lets You Update Construction Design Changes On The Fly!”

The More You Use This Memo Pad, More Architectural Sculptures Are Revealed…

Japanese company Triad created this unique set of memo pads, called Omoshiro Blocks (or “fun blocks”), which slowly reveals an architectural sculpture as you remove each page from the pad. It’s almost like you’re excavating a historical structure while making daily reminders to yourself! SCORE! Thanks to the precision of laser-cutting, these Omoshiro Blocks let it users make notes on over 100 appealing sheets of colored paper, while at the same time unveil amazingly detailed 3D architectural treasures distinctive to each note pad.  The pads contain tiny paper replicas of historic sites, ranging from the Tokyo Tower, to Sensō-ji, to the Buddhist Kiyomizu-dera Temple in Kyoto, and more. Continue reading “The More You Use This Memo Pad, More Architectural Sculptures Are Revealed…”

The Leewardists Ask: What If OTHER Professions Designed Buildings?…

The comic strips from The Leewardists aren’t unfamiliar to us here at The PractitioNERD, as their humorous take on the architecture culture and profession strikes our funny bones with perfect accuracy.  In the above comic, The Leewardists image an alternate take on how buildings would be designed if left solely to landscape architects, structural consultants, fire fighting consultants, sustainability consultants and government consultants. Of course, … Continue reading The Leewardists Ask: What If OTHER Professions Designed Buildings?…

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