A Barn Replacement + Farmhouse Restoration by Singer Baenziger Architekten

© Christian Senti

When Singer Baenziger Architekten took on this project of a farmhouse from the 1600s and a later-built barn (both sharing a cantilevered saddle roof) in the village center of Schlieren, Switzerland, they looked to restore the house while converting the barn building into a new living space. According to the design team, led by Roman Singer and Rémy Baenziger, the project will also include breaking up the singular roof through the use of roof windows and two roof sheds. Along with this, the outside landscape will retain the original exterior space, the unfinished nearby alley’s forecourt,  and the existing tree garden, but will add a new small private seating area for the farmhouse’s residential units.

© Christian Senti

Speaking of those residential units, they have direct access to the nearby village lane and the backyard garden with private sleeping areas that are protected by the shared roof.  This is due to the structure having three vertically organized units placed in a series, plus, with the structure being split-leveled, the retreat rooms are on three different levels with specific locations to enhance privacy and quality. Two units (located in the middle) extend to the existing cross gable — resulting in these elongated units getting increased natural lighting– , sharing the space with the over-risen residential and kitchen spaces.  Meanwhile, the third unit remains more narrow of the three, but has a three-story kitchen that opens up to the alleyway near the old port area formerly used for tractors.

© Christian Senti

The new replacement building that’s replacing the farm is intended to be a complete timber construction with some unused outstretched framework remains to act as a reminder to the old barn building. The new building gains depth from new facade elements (including the new large windows), which allows the original appearance of multi-purpose building  to remained preserved while replacement building doesn’t look jarring near the old farmhouse.

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