Student’s Thesis Turns Bus Into Tiny House

While it sucks that the blood, sweat, time and tears poured into projects that former architecture students like myself crafted resulted in no architecture job, it’s great to see a lot of us branch out with our design prowess.  For his thesis project, University of Minnesota architecture student Hank Butitta bought an old school bus and converted it into a flexible living space. Hmmm, sounds like I’ve written about these types of projects before….oh well. In the end, Butitta had a 225 square-foot mobile home — with a nod to the tiny house movement — with reused gym flooring and dimmable LED lighting.

The bus is divided — based on the 28-inch wide windows to guide the modules — into four primary zones: bathroom, kitchen, seating, and sleeping, with the space being able to be configured in a variety of combinations, depending on need.  On his website, Butitta says:

“This project was a way to show how building a small structure with simple detailing can be more valuable than drawing a complex project that is theoretical and poorly understood.”

After he graduated from UM this past May, Butitta embarked on a 5,000 mile road trip, now in progress, and he is planned another cross-country tour after this one.  His plan is to bring his bus and his story to architecture schools around the US, discussing how his project relates to the current state of architectural education and the tiny house movement. Doe’s this interest you? IT DOES?!? Then follow his journey over on his website.

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